online rental application

Before you start make sure that you have all your supporting documents ready

residential

  • Copy of ID / Passport
  • Proof of current address
  • 3 months latest bank statements
  • 3 months latest payslips
  • Any other details that may be relevant

commercial

  • Copy of Directors ID / Passport
  • Proof of Current Address
  • 3 months latest bank statements
  • Proof of Bank Account
  • Copy of Company Documents ( Certificate of Incorporation (CK1) or CIPRO certificate ) 
  • Any other details that may be relevant

What FICA documents are acceptable ?

How Long does the process take ?

Provided you have supplied us with all the necessary documentation, we will jump through hoops for you to ensure that you move in on time. There are however some factors that are out of our control

Credit check applicant
48 hours
Submit to landlord for approval
24 hours
Once approved, draw up lease
24 Hours
Sign lease make payment
24 Hours

FAQ

Most frequent questions and answers

Yes, TPN recommends that landlords perform a credit report on all adults over the age of 18 applying for rent. In terms of the National Credit Act Regulations 18 (4) (e) and (5) the tenant must first give his / her consent before the landlord (estate agent) can access your credit report.

If you refuse to give consent for the Agent to perform your credit check – the Agent is entitled to decline your application for rent.

The tenant and the landlord will negotiate this up-front. The amount of deposit due will be written in the lease agreement.

The landlord is entitled to negotiate whatever deposit he / she deems fit. It is common for the landlord to require one month’s rent or a double deposit (2 month’s rent). The landlord could even require a triple deposit if the tenant’s credit report is considered risky.

Yes, reasons for rejecting your application for rent might include your credit profile, affordability or suitability such as “no pets” allowed in the complex. 

Your application may not be rejected due to discrimination on the grounds of race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, sexual orientation, ethnic or social origin, colour, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.o.

The landlord is entitled to demand that all adults over the age of 18 co-sign the lease jointly and severally liable. This means that if any one of the co-tenants does not pay their portion of the rent, all the tenants become liable for any outstanding portion.

It is important that you, the tenant, understands your responsibility to the landlord. If you are unsure of your co-tenant’s ability to timeously pay their portion of the rent, it could affect your continued occupation of the property and your credit profile.

The tenant is protected by the common law “huur-gaat-voor-koop.” If the property is sold, the new owner becomes the landlord and all the terms of the existing lease are enforceable.

The owner cannot cancel the lease, but must wait until the end of your existing lease period. The new owner is also responsible to refund your deposit less any claim for damage.

There are some exceptions:

· If the lease agreement makes provision for the landlord to cancel in certain circumstances like the sale of the property

· If the property sold on auction by the Sheriff of the Court

In terms of the Rental Housing Act, the tenant and landlord / Agent must jointly perform incoming and outgoing inspections. This is to place on record any defects and subsequent damage for which the tenant may be liable. The incoming inspection does not place any obligation on the landlord to fix any defects.

If the landlord (estate agent) does not perform both the incoming and outgoing inspection, it is deemed the property was handed back in good order and the landlord will have no further claim for damages.

However, if the landlord attempts to make arrangements for the outgoing inspection and the tenant fails to respond, the landlord can access the property within 7 days of the expiration of the lease to assess for any damages and apply the costs for repair against the deposit.

A verbal lease agreement is binding. However a written lease agreement is advisable as this protects both the tenant and the landlord in the event of a dispute. In terms of the Rental Housing Act, the tenant can demand the lease is reduced to writing. 

The landlord can apply the deposit to any amount due by the tenant – outstanding rent or utilities, reasonable payment for damages to the property (for example: cleaning of carpets, lost keys or remotes and returning the state of the property back to its original state at the beginning of the lease), fair wear and tear excluded.

If during the outgoing inspection, it is established there are no damages, the deposit must be refunded within 7 days of expiry of the lease.

If during the outgoing inspection, damages are noted, the balance of the deposit must be refunded within 14 days of restoration of the property.

If the tenant fails to attend the outgoing inspection, the balance of the deposit must be refunded within 21 days of the expiry of the lease.

The tenant is entitled to all receipts for the cost of repairing any damages

The tenant and landlord cannot contract outside of these obligations. For example, the landlord / Agent cannot state in the lease agreement that the deposit will only be refunded in 30 days – this would be in contravention of the Rental Housing Act

No, you have an obligation to pay the proper amount of rent at the proper place and time.

If you fail to pay the last month’s rent you are committing a breach of lease and the landlord is entitled to take the necessary legal action including blacklisting on credit bureaux.

Yes, the landlord (estate agent) is entitled to inspect the property. But the inspection must be pre-arranged for a reasonable time.

You may not unreasonable deny the landlord (estate agent) access to inspection. The landlord may not enter the property without your consent which consent you may not unreasonably withhold.

Common law states the landlord must hand over and maintain the property fit for the purpose for which it was let.

However many lease agreements deal with maintenance of the property differently. It is advisable to ensure you have read the “Maintenance” clause of the lease agreement carefully to ensure you are aware of your obligations and the landlord’s obligations.

Most lease agreements provide that the landlord is responsible to maintain the structure of the property and any electrical, plumbing or electrical apparatus which you have not damaged.

Generally the tenant is responsible to maintain the inside of the property “fair wear and tear” excluded.

The landlord does not have an obligation to fix every item the tenant deems necessary. Items which render the property unfit for the purpose for which they were let, such as no water / electricity, a burst geyser, non-working oven etc. would need to be attended to by the landlord. However the landlord would not be obligated to fix items such as missing internal keys, blown light bulbs and squeaky doors.

Again, it is important to point out that many lease agreements provide for different obligations pertaining to maintenance – read your specific lease agreement to confirm your responsibilities and the landlord’s

The landlord must maintain the property fit for the purpose for which it was let. If the landlord fails to honour this obligation, you may demand in writing that he attend to the maintenance. The maintenance in question must be a material breach by the landlord such as no water / electricity, a burst geyser or non-working oven. A material breach does not include missing internal keys, blown light bulbs etc.

If the landlord fails to remedy a material breach you should cancel the lease and vacate the property or take legal action.

If you withhold rent, you yourself are committing a material breach and the landlord can take the necessary action to collect the rent – cancellation of the lease, court order eviction or blacklisting on credit bureaux.

Refer to the lease agreement, specifically to any cancellation clause.

If the lease agreement is month-by-month, then a calendar months notice is required to cancel the lease.

If the lease agreement is for a fixed period and there is no cancellation clause, then the tenant can rely his right to early cancellation in terms of the Consumer Protection Act but remember the landlord can charge a reasonable cancellation penalty.

The landlord can apply the deposit to any amount due by the tenant – outstanding rent or utilities, reasonable payment for damages to the property (for example: cleaning of carpets, lost keys or remotes and returning the state of the property back to its original state at the beginning of the lease), fair wear and tear excluded.

If during the outgoing inspection, it is established there are no damages, the deposit must be refunded within 7 days of expiry of the lease.

If during the outgoing inspection, damages are noted, the balance of the deposit must be refunded within 14 days of restoration of the property.

If the tenant fails to attend the outgoing inspection, the balance of the deposit must be refunded within 21 days of the expiry of the lease.

The tenant is entitled to all receipts for the cost of repairing any damages

The tenant and landlord cannot contract outside of these obligations. For example, the landlord / Agent cannot state in the lease agreement that the deposit will only be refunded in 30 days – this would be in contravention of the Rental Housing Act